Types of Discrimination and How they Relate to Asylum Claims

Rainbow flag (LGBT movement) on the sky backgroundReligious grounds

Many countries have a national faith and non-secular laws based around those beliefs. If a person does not wish to conform to the national faith, they may need to hide this fact for fear of persecution and imprisonment for breaking the law.

If someone wants to follow another religion, they might need to do so in secret. It can be difficult to prove that someone practices an alternative faith for this reason. There are, however, ways to make a case. An immigration solicitor in London can assist their clients with putting together evidence of faith, as far as is practical, and many applications have been successful.

Race

Racial discrimination has led to violence and genocide of incredible proportions in countries all over the world. Civil war can mean that people are forced to leave their home countries and seek asylum elsewhere. Often, this leads to massive a massive influx of refugees to neighbouring countries. This comes with its own set of issues such as accommodating and supporting the extra population.

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Racial discrimination and fear of persecution can also occur on the level of individual cases. An immigration solicitor in London, like Saracens Solicitors, can help people put together a case for seeking asylum because they fear they will be persecuted on the basis of race.

Gender

Fear of persecution on the basis of gender is normally related to potential violence against women. If someone is experiencing domestic violence within the UK as well as fearing reprisal if they return to their home country, it is important to speak to someone in a trustworthy position such as an immigration solicitor in London or talk to a charity or support group.

Sexuality

Stonewall is a leading gay right charity and they state that:

  • 72 countries criminalise same-sex relationships (and in 45 the law is applied to women as well as men);
  • The death penalty is either ‘allowed’, or evidence of its existence occurs, in 8 countries.
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Someone from one of these countries could make a case that they are at high risk of persecution if returned to their home country and make a claim for asylum based on this.